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Paper Beast

Somewhere, in the depths of a data server, an ecosystem is born : Paper Beast. An unknown force seems to weigh on its balance. Head off on an adventure in this unique virtual reality odyssey, and unite your talents with the colourful, fragile creatures that inhabit it to unravel the mysteries of this world.

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Haven

Yu and Kay have run away to an abandoned planet to be able to stay together. The two lovers’ survival depends on that of the environment that the intimate roleplaying game Haven proposes to embody, alone, or with two players, in a saga that explores the themes of survival, love and freedom.

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Enterre-moi mon amour

Enterre-moi, mon amour is an adventure game in which you experience the journey of Nour, a Syrian migrant heading for Europe. Majd, her husband, stayed behind in Syria. He communicates with her through messages and advises her as best he can so that she gets to her destination.

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Romanica

The world of Romanica is dying since only one language has been spoken. By taking on the darkness over 75 epic levels, you are the only one that can bring back life, culture and light to this multi-language world in distress.

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Dead Cells

The kingdom is governed by a tyrant who turns his subjects into an army of monsters. You play an infected hero who tries to get his own back on the monarch in a tentacular castle that’s constantly changing, lacking a control point. Dead Cells won the best mobile video game award in the first video game Pégases awards.

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11-11 Memories Retold

11 November 1916. A young photographer leaves Canada to fight in Europe. The same day, a German technician is told his son has been declared missing. 11-11:Memories Retold retraces the moving story of two soldiers on opposite sides during the 1st World War.

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Greedfall

In Greedfall, explore the unexplored lands of a magical island and uncover ancestral secrets protected by supernatural creatures. Build alliances or betray whole factions to forge the destiny of this world with a look inspired by 17th century Europe, confronted with health, colonial and environmental issues. Influence its story through combat, diplomacy, or tricks… and shape your legend.

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Le royaume d’Istyald

The Tree of Knowledge, source of all knowledge and wisdom, is dying. You are the only one that can unite the divided people to fight the shadow lord and re-establish the Kingdom’s threatened harmony. Available on the website of the BNF (National Library of France) dedicated to Fantasy and its origins, the Kingdom of Istyald is a narrative adventure video game that gives you the opportunity to explore a superb world inspired by Tolkien’s heroic landscapes to save the tree of knowledge and get back to the origins of Fantasy.

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Alt-Frequencies

What would happen if the whole world was blocked in a time loop, without knowing it ? In Alt-Frequencies, record audio extracts, broadcast them and unravel the mystery of the time loop in an interactive radiophonic investigation.

Alt-Frequencies won the Academy special price, « Au-delà du jeu vidéo » (Beyond the video game), in the first video game Pégases awards.

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Prisme7

The first video game by the Centre Pompidou, Prisme7 is an invitation to discover modern and contemporary art by interacting with the works of the Musée national d’art moderne (National Modern Art Museum) collection. Moving between colour and light, the player explores an organism that gradually builds up as the artistic and sensorial aspects of forty or so emblematic works are discovered.

Digital
Culturegamer.fr, independent French video gaming showcased

Today

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 1

For this exhibition, her first in Brazil, the artist moves away from the large metal figures of the beginning of her career, as well as the fine materials used to make them (copper, brass), to start working with cardboard, paper and plastic, considered to be « poor » materials with a less refined aesthetic.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 2

Caroline Mesquita presents a video installation composed of a large « mother cell », the audience is invited to enter to see a film created for the exhibition. The work resembles a scientific documentary, a microscopic study.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 3

« It’s a stroll through the human body, during which you come across red blood cells, bacteria, viruses and many other micro-organisms in abstract and colourful landscapes. » explains Caroline Mesquita.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 4

With this new video, a sort of dreamlike exploration inside the human body, microscopic dramas flirt with the burlesque, whereas cells and worlds cobbled together dissolve into one another. As such the artist hopes to draw our attention to the details, textures and sounds that run through life.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 5

Born in 1989 in Brest, Caroline Mesquita mainly works with metal (steel, copper, brass and stainless steel) which she subjects to experiments with oxidation, ammonia, or hydrochloric acid and patina, occasionally adding paint or fabrics. To surround these metallic creations, she also creates soundscapes and films of her performances.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 6

Caroline Mesquita graduated from the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts de Paris (2013), and studied at the Mountain School of Arts in Los Angeles (2014). She was given her first solo exhibition at the Bains-Douches in Alençon (2014), then the Parc Saint-Léger in Pougues-les-Eaux (2015), at Jupiter Artland in Edinburgh (2016) and Kunstverein Langenhagen (2016).

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 7

More recently, the artist was given a personal exhibition at the Fondation Ricard in Paris in 2017, winning the Prize the same year, at 221A in Vancouver (« The Ballad », 2017), the Centre Pompidou in Paris (« Night Engines », 2018), the Kunsthalle Lissabon (Lisbon, 2018) and the Galeria Municipal (Porto, 2019) with the « Astray » exhibition.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 8

Her work has also been included in various group exhibitions: Monnaie de Paris (2012), Fondation d’entreprise Ricard (Paris, 2013), Astrup Fearnley Museet (Oslo, 2014), Fahrenheit (Los Angeles, 2014), Galerie Carlier-Gebauer (Berlin, 2014), La Loge (Brussels, 2018), Bonniers Konsthall (Stockholm, 2019), Palais de Tokyo (Paris, 2019, « Future, Former, Fugitive »).

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 9

For several years, the artist has been developing an ambitious work of video installations, where the sculptural elements play the role of characters. Created using stop-motion, the films have « Georges Méliès-like » accents, but are also inspired by Polish avant-garde animations of the 70s.

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Exposition « In Vivo », de Caroline Mesquita 10

Dorothée Dupuis, exhibition curator, is a curator, art critic and publisher. She is interested in interactions between art and politics, particularly through the prism of feminist and postcolonial theories. After having been assistant curator at the Centre Pompidou, then director of Triangle France in Marseille, she is now a freelance curator based in Mexico, and director of the magazine Terremoto.mx.

Visual arts
« In Vivo » Exhibition, by Caroline Mesquita

1 day ago

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 1

« We met Ousmane Kà in 2016 when we were preparingour planned « Wilwildu»exhibitionat the Grand Café – Saint-Nazaire Art Centre. With his workshop in Guédiawaye on the outskirts of Dakar, he created the canvas for our « North/South loungers».In February 2019, he is hosting us as an for a week’s learning and together we are planning new woven collaborations, in particular this woven « ocean liner».

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 2

« We told Ousmane the story of the Ancerville liner, which left the Saint-Nazaire shipyards in 1961 to connect Marseille and Dakar. It will be repainted and renamed Minghua after it was taken over by the People's Republic of China in 1973 to serve its cooperation projects in Tanzania. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 3

« We have used the medium of weaving to understand and share this network bearing witness to the history of globalisation. The issues of interdependence, the movement of people, forms and techniques, goods and raw materials, and the inequity of our economies are our strands of research. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 4

« With weaving as the only common language, Sébastiao Yé, assistant to Ousmane Kà, teaches us the weaver’s knot and the threading of the comb, patiently guiding our gestures. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 5

We programme the ocean liner pattern with the method learned from Ousmane Kà. The anamorphosis created by the preparatory rods reminds us of a drawing spotted in a militant anti-colonial magazine in the 1970s.

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 6

This skilful artisanal technique is common to other weaver cultures such as those in China and Lyon silk weavers, and it prepared the advent of the Jacquard mechanisms. In West Africa, it is used by weavers from Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau.

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 7

« The Ancerville liner appeared for the first time on our weave in Nantes. We sent a photo to Ousmane Kà via WhatsApp. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar8

« The Ancerville liner appeared for the first time on Ousmane Kà’s loom in Dakar. He made an image for us first of all, followed by a few alterations of the pattern and its series. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar

« This new pattern, resulting from our collaboration with Ousmane Kà, represents the master weaver handing down his knowledge. It combines with a recognised Mandjaque pattern which, we were told, protects against theft and impersonation. We put our three names in the cloth to commemorate this moment, as is often done on traditional loincloths. »

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Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar 10

« With the Coronavirus Covid-19 health crisis, the idea of a Corona pattern was born because the Mandjaque loincloth patterns protect the wearers against evil. The collaboration continues. The pattern was designed by Patrick Bernier for the Tëss weaver’s workshop in Saint-Louis-du-Senegal, directed by Maï Diop. The weaving was carried out by Assane Diop and her assistant Antoine Mendy in April 2020. »

Visual arts
Craft
Le rêve du Paquebot (The Ocean Liner Dream) by Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin: learning between Nantes and Dakar

4 weeks ago

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

Born in 1974, Latifa Echakhch practises painting, sculpture, video and installation. She draws inspiration from her memories, the political events that marked her, literature, music and poetry. While the romantic landscapes of her childhood had a profound impact on her aesthetics and awareness, her formal vocabulary has been influenced by minimalism and art history from the 1960s to the 1970s.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

Having lived in Paris for several years, Latifa Echakhch now lives and works in Martigny in the Swiss Alps. Awarded the prestigious Marcel Duchamp Contemporary Art Prize in 2013 and the Zurich Art Prize in 2015, the artist has now gained international recognition. She is represented by the Kamel Mennour (Paris/London), Kaufmann Repetto (Milan/New York), Dvir (Tel Aviv/Brussels) and Metro Pictures (New York) galleries.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

The title of the exhibition refers both to the sunset and to the artistic or theatrical set – the installation of a stage, the assembly of décor and objects defining a stage where action takes place. Latifa Echakhch has often used décor's potential for activation. The large painted curtains show landscapes at sunset, each linked to a personal story lived by the artist.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

Here Latifa Echakhch covers picture rails with blue carbon leaves. The artist combines a reference to the Klein blue and ultramarine blue of romantic landscapes with the carbon blue of political leaflets. The title refers to Yasser Arafat’s words in the late 1960s to describe the sequence of global political and social demands.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

The surface of this mural depicting a crowd of protesters carrying banners is heavily chipped – as if the buildings themselves are crumbling. In the context of anera marked by political, economic and environmental turbulence, the work suggests the loss of illusions and insecurity and instability, as well as the collapse of visions common to the whole of humanity.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

This installation, composed of black bowler hats placed upside down and filled with black ink, refers to Magritte, Chaplin and the TV series Chapeau melon et bottes de cuir (Bowler Hat and Leather Boots). The work more broadly symbolises the figure of the poet and the creator, whose inks are ready to pour onto the floor to reveal shapes and words.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

One of the key figures who defining Latifa Echakhch’s work, both implicitly and explicitly, is the ghost. In many of her works the artist is conspicuous by her absence. She always presents the remnants of an action that has taken place, which she provoked and executed herself, but that she has never put centre stage. The artist systematically obscures the presence of bodies in favour of the traces they have left.

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

A small theatre is prepared to take in rainwater from a gutter running along the roof of the BPS22 museum. Here Latifa Echakhch reproduces a habit attributed to her uncle Saïd, who has always fascinated her. Due to limited access to the water supply in Khouribga, Morocco, he used to place a teapot under the gutter of his house to fill it with water and then prepare his « special tea ».

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« The Sun and the Set », de Latifa Echakhch

Latifa Echakhch places items of costume and musical instruments on the floor, along with go-go dancer outfits. These costumes reveal the absence of the body, a concept that plays a major role in the artist’s work. Taken from their respective contexts, these objects are detached from their anecdotal content and their formal rigidity to preserve only the intensity of the allegorical statement.

Visual arts
« The Sun and the Set », by Latifa Echakhch

6 weeks ago

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Aganta Kairos Groënland

Aganta Kairos is part of the generic piece Middle of Nowhere by Laurent Mulot, a long-distance work set in six continents. In all his work, he collaborates with inhabitants he meets in the territories he travels to. In Aganta Kairos, a celebration marked by a plaque, the site of the work is inaugurated and two witnesses are inducted to be the invisible, the conservators of the work and the poetic gesture.

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Aganta Kairos Océan Indien

Francisco Heriniaina and « Mr President », head of Efoetsy (« the navel »), a village of 200 inhabitants from the Mahafaly ethnic group, zebu farmers.

The Mahafaly have a close relationship with constellations, the ocean, the deceased and newborns.

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Aganta Kairos Océan Arctique

Julius Nielson, hunter-fisherman and guide, and Gerd Ignatuussen, Inuit shaman, are the witnesses for Aganta Kairos in front of the Sermilik Fjord glacier. Here in the Arctic Ocean, the goddess Sedna governs underwater life.

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Aganta Kairos, Océan Pacifique

Pauline Harris, an astrophysicist, and Pere Tanui, both Maori and members of the Onuku community which celebrates the sea, the land and those who look up to the sky, welcomed Laurent Mulot into their clan after initiating him and being witnesses to Aganta Kairos.

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Aganta Kairos Océan Atlantique

Yves Leber is the grandson of the former owner of Porquerolles Island, the land closest to the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino detector. Thierry Stolarczyk is an astrophysicist at the Institut de recherche fondamentale sur les lois de l’univers (Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe, CEA Saclay), scientific guide and advisor for Aganta Kairos. These are the Aganta Kairos witnesses for the Atlantic Ocean.

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Aganta Kairos, Océan Antarctique

The two witnesses for the Antarctic Ocean are Stanislas Devorsine and Benoît Hébert, both former captains of the Astrolabe. Benoît Hébert was also involved in the construction of the 6th Centre for Ghost Contemporary Art in Antarctica.

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Aganta Kairos et le 6e océan

Zhan-Ayrs Dzhilkibaev, Chief Scientist for the Baikal Neutrino Telescope and Vitaly Schur, engineer and the only permanent resident of the research centre, inaugurated the 6th Aganta Kairos plaque in the 2nd « garden » overlooking Lake Baikal. For Vitaly, the lake is a person.

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Lac Baïkal

Lake Baikal is considered an ocean in formation. To detect the passage of neutrinos, physicists plunge optical modules deep into the lake when it is frozen. After this exercise, there is nothing left of the experience – which has also become a ghost.

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Sur l’île d’Olkhon (Lac Baïkal)

Valentin, a shaman on the island of Olkhon, considered to be the cradle of world shamanism, talks with Lake Baikal, its flora and fauna like so many living beings. Alongside the driver of his « jicouly », an iconic Soviet Lada, he celebrates Aganta Kairos in an incantation to the cosmos.

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Tawhirimatea Beach, Nouvelle-Zélande

While science, shamanism and mythology do not proceed in the same way, they do not provide the same answers to questions about our origins and those of the universe that contains us, but the questions are sometimes connected. Tawhirimatea, the inconsolable Maori god of the original separation between earth and sky, celebrates the inseparable bond between these two entities; Aganta Kairos celebrates those who look at the earth, the sky and the sea…

Visual arts
Aganta Kairos by Laurent Mulot

9 weeks ago

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The Nights Still Smell of Gunpowder, by Inadelso Cossa (Mozambique)

Inadelso Cossa lives and works in Mozambique. Since 2006, he works as a film director, producer and cinematographer. The Nights Still Smell of Gunpowder, his new documentary in development, has already received support different funds.

Synopsis : Concerned with the fragmented memories of my childhood during the civil war in Mozambique, I return to my grandmother’s village to reveal the untold stories, which still haunt my generation.

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Coura + Oulèye, by Iman Djionne (Senegal)

Iman Djionne is a Senegalese director who has written and directed short films and audiovisual content. Iman is currently working on her first feature film, Coura + Oulèye. She took part in the Realness Screenwriters’ Residency in 2019 and Berlinale Talents in 2020.

Synopsis : Born into a polygamous family, two young sisters get to know each other after the death of their father, on a journey across Senegal.

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Babylon, by Francisco Bahia (Brazil)

Francisco Bahia is a Brazilian filmmaker. Directed short and half length films that address issues of territory and identity selected and awarded at different Brazilian festivals. Babylon is his first feature film as director.

Synopsis : A Haitian immigrant needs to investigate the death of an old friend, and the only way to do it is to encounter voodoo forces, from which he had distanced himself out of fear.

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Without a Name, by Valeria Valentina Bolivar (Dominican Republic)

Valeria Valentina Bolivar is a venezuelan director, screenwriter, producer and assistant director. In 2019, she took part in CineQuaNonLab, and with her first feature Without A Name she took part in Berlinale Talents.

Synopsis : Marcela is schizophrenic. She meets Joaquín, who has just emigrated from Venezuela where he left his son. They fall in love, and Marcela tries to overcome her condition to recover her son and have a family.

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A Pair of Leather Clogs, by Olga Korotko (Kazakhstan)

Olga Korotko is a Kazakh director who started as a student of an arthouse director D. Omirbayev, in collaboration with whom she later created films-research on cinema history. In 2016 she was selected for Berlinale Talents. Her first feature film, Bad Bad Winter, premiered at l’ACID in 2018.

A Pair of Leather Clogs is a family and political drama with elements of comedy, set up in Almaty.

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Temples to Heaven, by Sompot Chidgasornpongse (Thailand)

Sompot Chidgasornpongse is a Thai director. He worked with Apichatpong Weerasethakul as assistant director on many films. His feature documentary, Railway Sleepers (2016), had its European premiere at the Berlinale. He is currently working on his second feature film, 9 Temples to Heaven.

Synopsis : A family of 9 takes their grandmother on a merit-making trip to 9 temples in 1 day, hoping to prolong her life, but their trip takes an unexpected turn.

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Skin of Youth, by Ash Mayfair (Vietnam)

Ash Mayfair was born in Vietnam and received her MFA in filmmaking at NYU Tisch School of the Arts. Her feature debut, The Third Wife (2018), premiered at Toronto International Film Festival and won the NETPAC Jury Award.

Skin of Youth is about what it means to look at the idea of identity, womanhood and family against the backdrop of late 1990s Vietnam, from the perspective of youths who don’t fit into the accepted social norms.

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Gina, by Sara Stijović (Montenegro)

Sara Stijović was born in Montenegro, she is a senior in college studying Film and TV directing at FDA Cetinje. She is currently in the development phase of Gina, her first feature film.

Synopsis : Gina is the story of Gina Markuš – a young Montenegrin woman who was imprisoned during the 1950's in Yugoslavia and sent to the Naked Island (Goli Otok) to serve her sentence. A few years before committing suicide, she put everything on paper...

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Seeking Haven for Mr Rambo, by Khaled Mansour (Egypt)

Khaled Mansour is an Egyptian director. He directed four short feature all of which participated in local and international film festivals. Seeking Haven for Mr. Rambo is his first feature film.

Synopsis : A man can remain astray for a long time. But once he finds his destiny, he may have to pay for it with his life.

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Do you know anything about Omid?, by Keywan Karimi (Iran)

Born in 1985, Keywan Karimi is an Iranian filmmaker of Kurdish origin. Because of the themes of his short films, he received a prison sentence. Under house arrest, he was unable to attend the Critic’s Week Venice Film Festival for the premiere of his first feature film, Drum, in 2016. He is currently staying in France.

Do you know anything about Omid? is about the dark years of Iran in the 1980s, just after the revolution when many political prisoners were executed and murdered in prisons of the Islamic Republic.

Cinema
The 10 films supported by the Fabrique Cinéma 2020

13 weeks ago

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 1

Born in 1977 in Madagascar, Joel Andrianomearisoa lives and works in Antananarivo and Paris. He finds his inspiration in space and time, in Madagascar and around the world. Each trip is an emotional experience, from which he returns with fabrics: he then cuts, knots, tears, superimposes, weaves and assembles them until they form an interplay of materials and stories.

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 2

Josep Grau-Garriga, who passed away in 2011, was born in 1929 in Sant Cugat del Vallès, near Barcelona. He was the great master of Spanish tapestry in the 1970s. 

The grandson of an anarchist hairdresser, and raised in a family of republican peasants, he watched in horror as a teenager when Francoism triumphed in the 1930s. His work would enduringly be marked by this experience.

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 3

Born in France in 1978, Laure Prouvost studied in London at Central Saint Martins and later Goldsmiths College. Winner of the prestigious Turner Prize in 2013, she now lives and works in London, Antwerp and a caravan in the Croatian desert. She represented France at the Venice’s 58th International Contemporary Art Biennial, in 2019.

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 4

The power of Laure Prouvost's work lies in her ability to explore universal and topical issues, and to express them in new artistic forms, in fictional videos and sensual immersive installations. 

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 5

Lily Hibberd's practice revolves around the question of time, memory and desire, explored using a contemporary approach. A conceptual artist and writer, Lily Hibberd is Australian and lives in Paris. 

In 2019, Lily Hibberd took a photo here of the Sydney Observatory's transit room, based on the astronomical results of Henry Chamberlain Russell (1879-1881).

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 6

Here, Lily Hibberd has created a digital collage from two old photographs of the Sydney Observatory. Taken by Waterford on 6 February 1941, the photograph on the left shows Mary Allen and Ethel Wilcocks measuring astrographic plates. The one on the right, H. A. Lenehan at the transit circle, in 1907-1908 (anonymous).

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 7

A Franco-Algerian artist born in 1978, Mohamed Bourouissa endeavours to enable exchange and sharing with local communities. He is fascinated by urban utopias and the history of representation, and synthesises recurring questions: the appropriation of territories, power and transgression. 

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Out of the Blue, de Tarek Lakhrissi (2019)

Born in 1992 in Châtellerault, Tarek Lakhrissi is a poet, visual artist and performer. He developed a multifaceted artistic practice ranging from film to poetry, images, workshops and performances. 

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Biennale de Sydney 2020 : NIRIN 9

Juggling French, Arabic and English - thanks to which he gained access to the American queer culture - Tarek Lakhrissi's work revolves around two main threads: language and fiction.

Visual arts
Sydney Biennial 2020: « NIRIN »

17 weeks ago

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs - 1

“My project offers a metaphorical immersion into the stomach of a kind of an unknown tentacular animal, in order to find out who we are. I would like for each spectator to feel him/herself becoming a tentacle of the project.”

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

The fictional film of Laure Prouvost for the French Pavilion takes the form of an initiatory journey, a joyous saga filmed over the course of a roadtrip through France, from the Parisian suburbs to the north of France, from the Palais du Facteur Cheval to the Mediterranean Sea, and finally to Venice.

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“The film is the central element around which the piece is structured. It is in a way the head of my octopus, which means that the installation is alive because of the film, but not solely.”

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“My installation is a place of life in the depths of our subconscious.”

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“I like to question what we present and represent, who we are and where we go to, both personally and on the scale of humanity. There is also the idea of melting and mixing into more or less strong visions, which have more to do with sensations.” 

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“Idiomatic expressions, once translated, become very strong images, such as I will tell you loads of salads! Maybe there was a time when salads were told in the fields? I’m as much interested in knowing their context as deconstructing it.”

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

Using video, drawing, tapestry, ceramics, glass, photography, performance, and above all, language, Laure Prouvost creates immersive installations which plunge the viewer into a state of personal and collective introspection.

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“I had the idea of the octopus as a metaphor for the origins of our planet and, as human beings, for the development of our nervous systems. Its tentacles are key because they are the sensory extension of it.”

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“A trip to our unconscious. With the help of our brains in our tentacles, we dig tunnels to the past and the future. Let’s follow the light.”  

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, de Laure Prouvost, aux Abattoirs

“My grandmother in Roubaix forced me to bring a tapestry she made to Venice!”

Visual arts
Deep See Blue Surrounding You / Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, by Laure Prouvost, at the Abattoirs, in Toulouse

22 weeks ago

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 1

“In Mumbai, we created an ephemeral work with coloured powder, made from dyed sand and salt, called Rangoli. ”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 2

"On the roof of this little-used car park, at 35°C, we painted, in a blue reminiscent of the colour of the "azulejos" on the streets of Goa, plastic bags, bottles by the sea and other waste floating on the swimsuit of a giant sleeping lady."

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 3

“After a day of Rangoli, we are covered in pigment and as the last colour we used was black, we look like miners. Indians like to celebrate colours and throw dyed powders around, ending up covered in pigment.”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 4

“The powder drawing we made in Dharavi was not in itself a curiosity for the locals, except that it was much bigger than those made at the Rangoli festival. According to the police at the nearby police station, it was even the largest in India!”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 5

"The lady fell asleep on the roof of a car park, between the river dotted with floating casinos and the future motorway which will take her to the airport in a matter of minutes. She will wake up when the cars stop and the sand has returned. In the meantime, she dreams.”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 6

“This sleeping lady's bathing cap is inspired by 1970s models, when Goa was a paradise for hippies and environmental carelessness with regard to new materials, such as plastic. Her earring is reminiscent of the red bindi Indian women paint on her foreheads.”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 7

“We travelled through the city and its railway tracks on crowded trains, open doors, our hair in the wind, with our friend Alkemy, a local graffiti artist, until we found the perfect spot to create graffiti. We love the uncontrollable and free energy of the graffiti movement. We couldn't not do some lettering in Mumbai!”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 8

“This aerial photo was taken a few minutes before the local kids came out to play and started erasing the powder drawing. The laughing character will be tickled for three days before disappearing almost completely, worn away by footballs, bikes, motorbikes and passers-by. Sad to see it disappear, locals have invited us to paint it again on our next visit.”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 9

“We like to play with the erasure of our works. We have blown up painted walls in quarries for Blast, filmed the erasure of a sleeping giant by cleaners in Saint-Étienne, observed the slow disappearance of a drawing made on the turf of the Montargis aerodrome, watched the sea take a couple of lovers drawn with seaweed on a beach in Chile…”

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Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors », 10

“They're there, they're laughing, they're rummaging, they're shouting, they're playing. This design is a tribute, in Goa’s slum, to all the children we met between Mumbai and Goa. They were always there when we were painting, curious about what we were going to do and always encouraging us.”

Visual arts
Ella & Pitr, « Les Papiers Peintres – Railways, walls and floors »

26 weeks ago

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Sans titre, d’Emmanuelle Andrianjafy

From Madagascar to Dakar, Emmanuelle Andrianjafy’s camera is the primary tool with which she orients herself in a new environment. Her photo series Nothing’s in Vain presents a narrative, informed by her own experiences, about belonging and connection in the urban environment. Her photographs capture her impressions and her thoughts, telling the story of the city through urban realities, migration and labour movements.

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Poolside Boy, de Fanyana Hlabangane

The work of the South African artist exposes a certain side of Johannesburg, revealed through the soul of its inhabitants. Often at odds with their surroundings, the characters captured by Fanyana Hlabangane's lens highlight the unique way this city crushes everyone's sense of belonging, destroying their hopes and dreams.

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Long Road, d’Andrew Tshabangu

Andrew Tshabangu’s project bears witness to contemporary life on the island of La Réunion through its population, primarily its young people, and also through religion, work, public transport, etc. This series of photographs expands the artist’s practice, already focused on an appreciation for the simple things and life's everyday movements, and always in black and white.

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Love Story, d’Adama Jalloh

Adama Jalloh was born in Britain to parents from Sierra Leon. His project came into being as a vital tool for defining his own identity, split up until that point between the two countries to which he belongs. Love Story highlights the unique nature of the African diasporas in London, photographing these people as they go about their daily lives. The photographer seeks to bring an authenticity to mundane scenes and thus present a narrative about these communities.

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Angela Davis at the Keskidee Centre, d’Armet Francis

For many years, Armet Francis’s work has focused on the history of black people and Africa, not from a documentary point of view but from a more removed, dramatic perspective. By focusing more on the historical moment than on the identity of the people photographed, the artist gives the impression that his photographs are taken from a fairy tale.

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#I (Tshepang Dumelakgosi), de Jodi Bieber

In the post-apartheid era, Jodi Bieber's snapshots give a voice to South Africa's younger generation. These young people come from different social and economic backgrounds and present their country's challenges in their own ways. Each piece in this project gives a voice to an individual, who has chosen a word and a quote.

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Shaabi Beaches, de Roger Anis

For Roger Anis, the beach is the perfect place to learn more about a country. Shaabi Beaches takes us into the heart of Egyptian society through the photographer's lens. His photos bear witness to the popularity of beaches among Egyptians, 9 years after the revolution.

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Tenir (Anyway), de Fototala King Massassy

A true ode to ‘Africanness’ as a global concept, Tenir by Fototala King Massassy takes up the symbols of the struggles fought in the United States and around the world for Black emancipation. Keen to present this through a strong image, he captured fists decked out in lucky rings, each of which gives weight to their bearer's resistance.

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Air Twelve Land, de Khalil Nemmaoui

The Renault 12 is the central element of Khalil Nemmaoui’s project. Staging it in different surroundings, the artist plays with the geometric shapes of the vehicle and the arid, irregular landscapes of Morocco. The project aims to examine the intersection between technology, nature, architecture and mechanics.

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Scènes de vie, d’Amsatou Diallo

Using digital collages, Amsatou Diallo offers a reflection on the complexity of African identities in the face of globalisation. By superimposing everyday scenes from African cultures over photographs of urban environments in North Carolina, USA, the artist creates, within the image, a utopian multicultural space-time dimension.

Photography
Bamako Biennale, 12th edition

29 weeks ago

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Son Ar Mein et l'Asian University for Women

In February 2019, Son Ar Mein travelled to Bangladesh for a creative residency and a series of three concerts in Dhaka and Chittagong, with the choir from the Asian University for Women, South Asia's first all-female university. Through French baroque and Renaissance music and other European masterpieces, they all seek to promote the education and emancipation of young women from Asia and the Middle East.

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La Roue de la mort, de Galapiat Cirque

A symbol of the traditional circus, the wheel of death is renowned for the horror and admiration it elicits from the public. Based on these emotions, Galapiat Cirque wanted to reverse the trend with their "little" wheel of death, and open up many more possibilities. They thus make this vehicle a new game partner, both on the ground and in the water. Part of the residency for the creation of this project has taken place in Finland in 2019 and 2020.

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La résidence de création artistique de Sitala Lillin’Ba / Sitala Kounou

The Sitala associations have been working for 15 years on innovative artistic cooperation between France and Burkina Faso. In January 2019, Sitala Kounou, composed of musicians from France and Burkina Faso, created a creative residence as well as a time for exchanges and training for the professions of sound and light technicians. 

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Arbre, de Mylinh Nguyen

This travelling sound sculpture feeds on the interest it receives and the stories it tells: visitors listen to the stories submitted by those who came before them, and must in turn leave a message in the only structure with a microphone and represented by an ear. The work was presented at The Terminal Kyoto in October 2019 as part of the White Night.

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Emprunt – Urushi, d’Émilie Pédron

The technique developed by Émilie Pédron during her residency at Villa Kujoyama in 2016 involves harvesting natural clay that provides great richness in colours, textures, materials etc. A technique that she learned to complete in Kyoto in November 2019 by training in the traditional technique of repairing with lacquer (urushi) to carry out alterations.

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Toni Braga, Oficina Digital

In March 2019, Jean-Luc Thomas travelled to Brazil to record “Oficina Itinerante”, based on his multimedia show “Oficina”. Designed as a travel diary, the album, which will be released on 28 February 2020, pays tribute to the places and people the artist has met over the past 20 years.

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Lena Paugam

This piece by Xavier Maurel combines text and dance with the soundscape of the Ez3kiel group. Designed to be performed in the forest, Echo ou la parole est un miroir muet is re-created in situ with a new troupe of non-professional dancers in each territory where it is presented, notably in Brazzaville and Kinshasa in December 2019.

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Walk Man in Seoul, du Théâtre de l’Arpenteur

Walk Man in Seoul is the Korean version of a soundtrack concept developed in France by the Théâtre de l’Arpenteur. A creation designed by Hervé Lelardoux assisted by Ji-In Gook, which immerses the spectator in the city of Seoul and the memory of Seoulites. This project was presented in October 2019 during the Seoul Street Art Festival.

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Résidence de Samir Mougas à la Jam Factory

After a residency in Australia in the summer of 2019, Samir Mougas made a set of eight glazed sandstone wall sculptures that combined, in an animist dimension, mouldings of hubcaps and sausages. The residency allowed him to develop several enamel recipes to work on the glossy texture of his objects.

International artists from Brittany

Il y a 1 mois

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Mur de mûres, Pierre Joseph

Pierre Joseph, born in Caen in 1965, opens the Palais de Tokyo exhibition with a new series of Photographies sans fin (Endless Photography). Mur de mûres complements his previous projects Photographie sans fin: champ de blé (Endless Photography: Wheat Field (1 & 2), 2016) and Fondation Vincent van Gogh (The Vincent van Gogh Foundation (2018).

His work, in which a single element is multiplied, stacked up and repeated to the point of "indigestion," questions singularity in an ever more homogenous world.

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Insta - Tokyo, Alain Séchas

Born in 1955 in Colombes, the artist presents a series of drawings made between July 2018 and July 2019. He makes everyday life the centre of his work and approaches it through various subjects such as weather, news, social events and art. Not without humour, Alain Séchas reacts to everyday events by caricaturing his fellow citizens.

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Parfums de pauvres, de Fabienne Audéoud

"What interests me is what a play does to those who look at it, and the wider context in which it operates and how it performs.” The work of Fabienne Audéoud, who was born in 1968 in Besançon, examines stereotypes linked to the genres and economic circuits of major brand products.

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Land I, II, II by Adrien Vescosi and Carlotta Bailly-Borg

Born in 1984 in Paris, Carlotta Bailly-Borg presents an ensemble of glass paintings, bringing to life portraits of androgynous characters, men and women. Nestled in this space, these figures seek to exist in the eyes of the world.

 

Adrien Vescosi, born in Thonon-les-Bains in 1981, uses dye on fabric. For this new exhibition, the artist designed a bespoke painting, in keeping with the architecture and scale of the place. This monumental painting, suspended in the air as in time, greets the audience in its folds.

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J’ai vu les buffles d’eau, de Laura Lamiel

Through photography, drawing and painting, Laura Lamiel’s works find their essence in the space in which they are installed. On the mezzanine of the big glass roof of the Palais de Tokyo, the artist reveals her “plastic vocabulary”. This installation evokes an individual awareness of the current state of the world.

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Cambrai XVIII (2019) de Marc Camille Chaimowicz et Anepic de Madison Bycroft

Born in 1987 in Adelaide, Australia, Madison Bycroft seeks to inspire "friction and dysfunction" in visitors. She is particularly interested in theatre and its mechanisms, and in the representation of genres through disguise. Her new installation is inspired by deadpan humour and burlesque comedy.

 

Born in Paris in 1974, Marc Camille Chaimowicz is one of those who questions the boundary between art and life. He stands out for his way of working, recognisable by its floral patterns on a pastel background.

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D’un jour à l’autre, de Nathalie du Pasquier

Born in Bordeaux in 1957, Nathalie du Pasquier currently lives and works in Milan. Her work fluctuates between two and three dimensions.

For this exhibition, the artist has installed four "miniature museums" where both her own work and that of the artists she loves are exhibited.

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De gauche à droite : Vert clair (2019), Lactée (2019), Écume (2019), Troisième Soleil (2019) d’Antoine Château

Born in Fontaine-lès-Dijon in 1988, the painter Antoine Château likes to exploit many different surfaces and materials. For "Futur, ancien, fugitif "("Future, Old, Fugitive"), cardboard plates, plastic boxes and ceramic bowls serve as a base for creating a vivid and colourful horizon.

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Demain les chiens de Martin Belou

The works of Martin Belou, born in 1986 in L’Union, are composed of organic elements, objects and people that he exploits in modified environments.

The environment created for the exhibition is inhabited by smoke, an agave forest that seems to grow in a precarious and imaginary place. Constantly in motion, space is altered by light, particles, or even by the passage of visitors.

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Sans titre, de Jean-Luc Blanc

Jean-Luc Blanc, born in 1965 in Nice, closes the exhibition with a selection of works of paintings and drawings inhabited by madness. His works mark visitors to the exhibition so that they take with them the persistence image of these faces in their retina. “But how can you silence images without biting your tongue?” asks the artist.

Visual arts
A "certain" French scene at the Palais de Tokyo

Il y a 1 mois

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

Née en 1986, diplômée des Beaux-Arts de l’Université de Lisbonne (2011), Sara Bichão vit et travaille à Lisbonne.

Née en 1988 à Reims, diplômée de l’ENSAAMA Olivier de Serres (2009), Manon Harrois vit et travaille à Troyes.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

It all began with Boshko Boskovic, curator and director of Residency Unlimited (New York), inviting the two artists to perform Soundless Harmonies at the Rita Urso Gallery in Milan in 2014. Since then, the two artists have worked together regularly.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

Sara Bichão and Manon Harrois worked together in residence, first in the Auvergne Volcanoes Regional Nature Park, then on two Portuguese volcanic islands, first in the Azores and then in Madeira.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

“Un pyjama pour deux” is the second part of the project “Quand nous sommes deux, nous sommes trois” (“When We Are Two, We Are Three”), which focuses on language, translation and ownership. The guiding idea for both artists was that when two beings, two individuals or two parties communicate, a third form of language emerges ("2 = 3").

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

The two artists share the same inspiration for installations where sculptures, drawings, paintings and performances freely hybridise.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

Sara Bichão's work is strongly connected to ancestral practices of construction and manual work. Through drawing, painting and sewing, the artist creates works through the medium of her body.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

In this exhibition, two bodies divide to give rise to a two-voice conversation in a four-hand exhibition.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

The exhibition benefits from the loan of Roman objects from the collection of the Troyes Museum of Fine Arts and Archaeology.

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"Un pyjama pour deux", une exposition de Sara Bichão, en collaboration avec Manon Harrois, au CAC Passages, Troyes, du vendredi 04 octobre au vendredi 13 décembre 2019.

This exhibition is the result of a joint effort and is also a portrait of this collaboration.

Visual arts
“Un pyjama pour deux” (“One Pyjama For Two”) by Sara Bichão and Manon Harrois

Il y a 1 mois

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You/Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, Laure Prouvost

This film, broadcast on a loop in several rooms of the Pavilion, traces the journey undertaken by Laure Prouvost and 12 other characters, from the Paris suburbs to Roubaix, via Marseille and ending in Venice. 

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Deep See Blue Surrounding You/Vois Ce Bleu Profond Te Fondre, Laure Prouvost

"The initial idea was a journey towards an ideal elsewhere enabling us to learn how to understand ourselves better, as men or women, young or old people, French or foreigners." (Laure Prouvost)

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Tapestry by Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennial

This tapestry made for the exhibition acts as one of the many tentacles linked to the central work. It features characters from the film.

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Glass element of the tapestry, Laure Prouvost à la Biennale de Venise

A multidisciplinary artist, Laure Prouvost works in video, drawing, tapestry, ceramics, photography and glass.

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Side room, "Vois ce bleu profond te fondre", Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennial

Laure Prouvost has a special relationship with language. A fascination that she feeds with her personal experience, particularly following her move to London. The artist uses differences between mother tongue and adoptive language to design her works.  

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« Metal Men », Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennial

The exhibition is based on making every viewer feel like a tentacle in this project. Like the film's lead narrative, the artist invites each person, with their story, to participate in the formation of a "whole.”

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Colombe in Murano glass, Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennial

For this exhibition, Laure Prouvost worked in the Murano glass factories, right next to the Biennale. 

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Resin room, Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennale

In this room, the artist arranged everyday elements as if they were engulfed in the sea in reference to ecological disasters. Using glass allows her to create a “game on transforming liquidity and light”.

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Resin room, Laure Prouvost at the Venice Biennial

Laure Prouvost's work echoes the term "liquid modernity," formulated by the Polish sociologist Zygmunt Bauman. The concept defines a post-modern world governed by immediacy and communication, which make ancient bonds between humans and bodies disappear. It reveals the fragility of a society based on individualism and permanent change.

Visual arts
Last dive into the French Pavilion of Laure Prouvost

Il y a 1 mois

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Mak Remissa, Left 3 Days

Mak Remissa is considered the greatest Khmer photographer of his generation: born in 1970, he leads the way with his journalistic work and personal projects. With Left 3 Days, for the first time in 40 years he recalls his past and the Khmer Rouge genocide, recreating scenes of daily violence with cut-out paper figurines. . 

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Philong Sovan, City by Night

Born in 1986 in Cambodia, Philong Sovan reveals the lives of those left behind in society, illuminated at night by his motorbike headlights. From his first experience as a photojournalist, Philong Sovan has retained a deep attachment to exploring and analysing the world in which he lives.

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Charles Xelot, Il y a du gaz sous la toundra

Born in 1985, Charles Xelot was a biologist before turning to photography. His work questions the world of industry and its relationship with people. Now based in Moscow, the photographer shot Il y a du gaz sous la toundra in the Yamal Peninsula in the Russian Arctic, home to one of the largest gas reserves in the world.

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Céline Clanet, KOLA

Born in 1977, Céline Clanet spent five years exploring the Kola Peninsula, the Russian Lapland. During the Soviet era this territory of 100,000 km2 housed military installations and nuclear weapons, and today is still a strategic territory where the Sami have been trying to preserve their identity for thousands of years.

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Sorn Seyhaktit, dit Ti Tit

Ti Tit, a Cambodian blogger and photographer born in 1977, uses self-portraiture, where nothing is taboo, to question the identity of younger generations, society, sex and politics using irreverence, humour and provocation. 

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Wrapped Future, de Sokchanlina Lim

Sokchanlina Lim, a Cambodian photographer born in 1987, draws attention to the social, political, cultural and environmental problems affecting Cambodia, linking them to global issues.

The Wrapped Future series questions the combination of the human landscape and the natural landscape. 

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Sophal Neak, Hang On

Born in 1989 in Cambodia, Sophal Neak is one of the emerging talents of the Cambodian art scene. The photographer questions the relationship between status, identity and society and shows through her portraits without faces, which are hidden by a tool or object, the invisibility of people reduced to their working status by society. 

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SMITH, Löyly

Through photography, cinema, video, choreography, bioart and the use of new technologies, SMITH, born in France in 1985,  questions human identity and in particular the subject of transition, which is the central issue of his artistic practice. 

Photography
Photo Phnom Penh 2019

Il y a 1 mois

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Sogol Ahmadieh Kashani, What Happened to Cypress? (2019)

Artist and painter Sogol Ahmadieh Kashani focuses his work on human issues in different societies, through the lens of emotions such as loneliness or bewilderment. She specifically explores the impact of urban environments and populated spaces on the way different beings live, using a language that is at once abstract and inclusive.

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Hugo De Almeida Pinho, The Valley of Thousand Smokes (2015)

Hugo de Almeida Pinho combines theoretical research with metaphorical statements, developing an artistic practice that takes into account the nature of images and their ability to alter reality and perception. Working primarily on specific cultural, historical and sociopolitical contexts through a variety of mediums, the artist's work aims to reflect the historical construction of how technology shapes our perception.

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Juana Garcia Pozuelo, Jeton d'amour « J » (2017)

In Paris, Juana García-Pozuelo is developing pictorial works around the Museum of Romantic Life and its collection. The artist and painter has always been interested in the relationship between a building and its inhabitants, as well as in tracing the meanings certain people have attributed to places that would otherwise remain anonymous.

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Feng Li, Ripples (2017)

Feng Li is the creator of the series of photographs White Night, which began in 2005. Through daily scenes from the city of Chengdu, he delicately captures human and urban wildlife in all its forms. His work White Night (2017) was nominated for the Aperture PhotoBook Awards and won the Jimei x Arles Discovery Award. His works were exhibited at the Rencontres d'Arles in 2018.

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Monopoly (2018), de Carl-Oskar Linné (Suède)

Carl-Oskar Linné's projects use places as their starting point. The visual artist and photographer collects texts, slogans, interviews, reports and statistics, which he pairs with visual elements. His works often take the form of sculptural signs. They often feature the themes of urban planning, property speculation and poverty.

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Patch (2015), d’Asya Marakulina (Russie)

Visual artist Asya Marakulina is continuing to develop her project Clouded Education, based on observations of the movement and shape of clouds, through photographs, sketches and texts. Providing visual information which may be perceived differently depending on the spectator's state of mind, she sees clouds as a universal educational material. The artist plans to make a book of the observations she gathers in Paris.

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Joubeen Mireskandari, Flatland (2014)

Joubeen Mireskandari photographs subjects in his studio, while simultaneously capturing their images in the city to reveal portraits with multiple faces. The portrait photography in his studio becomes a Freudian mirror where the attitudes and mental states of his subjects are revealed, while the lens of his camera recounts their social and cultural backgrounds.

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Anna Rotaenko, Killer Pool (2019)

Through an artistic practice which combines video art, cinema and musical composition, Anna Rotaenko is working on a graphic series entitled “Where is the magic”, which dissects post-capitalist relations with art, particularly through the recording of conversations systematically constructed using statistical diagrams. An ironic video, Killer Pool features utopian advertisements from an idyllic island, where the viewer can fully relax.

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Hemant Sreekumar, Godsignal (2017)

Hemant Sreekumar is currently working on emerging collaborative listening strategies which create more permeable boundaries between performers and listeners, artists and audiences. Performances, prints, works based on light, etc.: his work responds to the concepts of decay, generative bias and semantic loss.

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Cosmos (2019), de Cecilia Szalkowicz (Argentine)

Cosmos presents an abstract story built from a series of objects. Functioning like a slide show, the installation - which takes its title from Witold Gombrowicz's 1965 book - explores how we construct our senses.

Artists in residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris

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